Dr. Mallika Marshall

WBZ-TV's Dr. Mallika Marshall

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Mallika Marshall, MD, is an Emmy-award winning journalist and physician who serves as the regular Health Reporter at WBZ-TV in Boston. A practicing physician who is Board Certified in both internal medicine and pediatrics, Marshall serves on staff at Harvard Medical School and practices at the Massachusetts General Hospital’s (MGH) Chelsea Urgent Care Clinic and MGH Revere Health Center.

Marshall is currently a Contributing Editor for Harvard Health Publications (HHP), the publishing division of Harvard Medical School. She has nearly 15 years of media experience, including serving as “HealthWatch” Anchor at WBZ-TV News for 10 years beginning in 2000. Since working at WBZ-TV, Marshall was the Medical Contributor on Katie Couric’s daytime talk show “Katie.” She served as the medical contributor for New England Cable News (NECN) and as the Medical Director for Everyday Health, digital media’s popular source of medical news. Marshall also has served as the host of “Dr. Mallika Marshall,” a series of health news reports that was nationally syndicated and aired in more than 70 markets, including major cities such as San Francisco, Atlanta, St. Louis, Cleveland, and Houston.

A cum laude graduate of Harvard College, Marshall received her medical degree with honors at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) School of Medicine. She completed her medical residency at Harvard in internal medicine and pediatrics. She is a member of the Alpha Omega Alpha Honors Society, the American Medical Association, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the National Association of Black Journalists. She also has served on the Board of Trustees for the Urgent Care Foundation and the Board of Directors for Dress for Success Boston.

In addition to numerous medical awards, she was an Associate Editor of the Harvard Medical School Family Health Guide and a Contributing Editor for the Harvard Medical School affiliated website, InteliHealth.

Marshall is writing a series of children’s books that will deliver healthy messages in entertaining stories for school-age children.

Boston’s WBZ-TV and sister-station myTV38 (WSBK-TV) are part of CBS Television Stations, a division of CBS Corporation. For more, go to http://www.cbsboston.com, like us on Facebook at CBS Boston and follow us on Twitter @CBSBoston.

Fathers Can Pass Ovarian Cancer Risk To Their Daughters

A new study finds that a higher risk of ovarian cancer can be passed from father to daughter.

02/22/2018

Compounds In Red Wine May Promote Good Oral Health

Compounds found in red wine may promote good oral health.

02/22/2018

HealthWatch: Low-Carb Vs. Low-Fat? Probably Doesn’t Matter

Wondering whether you should go on a low-carb or low-fat diet? A new study finds it probably doesn’t matter.

02/21/2018

HealthWatch: Drinking Soda May Impact Fertility

Could drinking soda affect your chances of having a baby?

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HealthWatch: Cleaning Products Could Cause Lung Damage In Women

A new study finds that regularly using cleaning sprays or other cleaning products could put women at risk for lung damage.

02/19/2018

MGH Doctors Touched By Gun Violence Make A Plea for Action

While trauma surgeons are trained to treat victims of violence, they’re humans too.

02/15/2018

HealthWatch: How to Talk To Your Children After a School Tragedy

WBZ-TV’s Dr. Mallika Marshall has advice on how to talk to children about a horrific event like the school shooting in Florida.

02/15/2018

Local Woman Waits For a Heart On Valentine’s Day

After many trips to the ER, doctors finally figured out her heart was enlarged, weak and failing.

02/14/2018

Darwin’s Dogs Project Takes Closer Look At Pets’ DNA And Behavior

A UMass Medical School researcher is mapping out DNA from dogs and information from their owners that could lead to healthier lives for both.

02/13/2018

HealthWatch: Ultrasounds Don’t Cause Autism; Kids Benefit From Activity Before School

There has been some concern that prenatal ultrasounds could increase the risk of autism in children but a new study suggests otherwise.

02/12/2018

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