NEWwbztv-small wbz-am-small 985-small mytv38web2

Local

It’s Not Over Yet: Two-Part Storm Will Resume Overnight

By Terry Eliasen, Meteorologist, WBZ-TV Exec. Weather Producer
View Comments

Get Breaking News First

Receive News, Politics, and Entertainment Headlines Each Morning.
Sign Up

BOSTON (CBS) – Many folks woke up to a fresh inch or two of snow this morning; this is just part one of this two-part weekend snow event.

The snow band will continue to move east and weaken Saturday, and for most of the midday and afternoon there wont be much going on in Southern New England.

During this time, a significant ocean storm will start to form off of the Mid Atlantic, and later Saturday night, part two will arrive in Southern New England.

Unfortunately the ultimate track of this ocean storm still remains a bit of a mystery. A shift of 50 miles in one direction will mean the difference between several inches of snow or very little accumulation.

As of now it looks like the steady snow from part two will arrive late Saturday night, near or just after midnight.

It will last through Sunday morning and taper off midday Sunday, the last to see the snow end would be the Outer Cape.

The best chance of significant accumulation from the ocean storm will be Cape Cod and the Islands as well as extreme southeastern Massachusetts, near the Coast; 4-6″ of snow are possible down there with as much as 6-8″ on the Outer Cape.

For the rest of Eastern Massachusetts, including Boston, 2-4″ are likely, but again a little shift in storm track could raise or lower those totals a few inches in either direction.

North and west of 128 and 495 very little snow accumulation is expected, just a dusting to an inch or two Sunday morning.

It will look pretty stormy for a while on Sunday morning. Winds along the Coast will be rather gusty for a time and will whip the falling snow around.

Again, I would stress with this event that it is important to stay tuned to updates. Just a small change in storm track will shift the expected snow amounts higher or lower by several inches.

View Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus