No matter what anyone says, Boston is and always will be the city of champions. All four of our major sports teams — the Patriots, Red Sox, Celtics and Bruins have all won championships within the past decade, so there is no shortage of sports memorabilia, sports gear and fan souvenirs of all kinds. From rare trading cards to current jerseys and pieces of the stadiums, these five shops have just about everything a Boston sports fan could possibly ever want.

TD Garden in Boston (WBZ-TV)

TD Garden in Boston (WBZ-TV)


TD Garden Pro Shop
100 Legends Way
Boston, MA 02114
(617) 624-1500
tdgardenapps.com/proshop

For hockey and basketball fans, the TD Garden Pro Shop is the best place to go for sports memorabilia. Since the TD Garden is home to the Bruins and the Celtics, the shop is able to feature the greatest selection of current and past jerseys, autographed materials, sports gear and souvenirs. The Pro Shop offers all of the official gear any sports fan could want. This is where fans can find the popular Patriots pom pom hats that will make even beach bums excited for winter weather and football!

(Photo Credit: Marathon Sports Facebook page)

(Photo Credit: Marathon Sports Facebook page)


Marathon Sports
671 Boylston St.
Boston, MA 02116
(617) 267-4774
www.marathonsports.com

Marathon Sports is Boston’s favorite sportswear boutique. While they specialize in athletic gear and running shoes, they also have plenty of gear for Boston sports spectators. The well-known store opened in 1975 in Harvard Square and has won “best of Boston” awards so many times since then that Boston Magazine has bestowed their prestigious “Hall of Fame” award to Marathon Sports!

(Photo Credit: Kenmore Collectibles)

(Photo Credit: Kenmore Collectibles)


Kenmore Collectibles
466 Commonwealth Ave., Suite 103
Boston, MA 02215
(617) 482-5705
www.kenmorecollectibles.com

Kenmore Collectibles is for the the serious sports memorabilia people — particularly for those who are interested in baseball cards. Kenmore Collectibles deals in all sorts of hobbies of value, but they are specifically known for their antique and rare sports pieces. Head to Kenmore Collectibles to have a card collection valued or to seek out a specialty card. The shop began with just sports cards in 1988, but has since expanded to precious metals, coins and stamps.

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Sportsworld, Inc.
47 Newbury St.
Peabody, MA 01960
(781) 233-7222
www.sportsworldinc.com

Sportsworld is worth the twenty minute drive north of Boston because they are the largest sports memorabilia shop in all of New England! There, sports fans will find everything from gear and training equipment to super fan apparel and memorabilia. Additionally, Sportsworld often hosts specialty events at their venue, including autograph shows. The Sportsworld team is also very price conscious and always makes sure customers get the best value and the best gear for their specific needs.

(Photo Credit: Yawkey Way Store)

(Photo Credit: Yawkey Way Store)


Yawkey Way Store
19 Yawkey Way
Boston, MA 02215
(617) 421-8686
http://www.yawkeywaystore.com/

The Yawkey Way Store is a must-visit for any baseball fan. Located right next to the legendary Fenway Park, Yawkey Way Store has the best collection of Red Sox gear in the city, and probably the entire country. Yawkey Way Store features a variety of memorabilia for sale, including season year books, old Fenway seats, used game dirt, old bases, champagne bottles from various World Series wins, and, of course, signed balls, bats and jerseys. To experience the full atmosphere of the store, visit an hour or so before game time. The street will be filled with Boston fans and the air will smell of Fenway franks and fried dough.

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Cameron Bruns is the founder of BostonGreenBlog.com and co-author of Just Us Gals Boston. She lives in Boston’s North End, where her goal is to promote ethical, stylish, and sustainable lifestyle choices to all Boston residents. Her work can be found on Examiner.com.

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