Art-enthusiasts looking for some interesting abstract art exhibits in Boston will be in luck this fall — and beyond. There are several galleries available for viewing that will get your mind moving. Abstract art does not represent external reality, but uses things like color and texture to try and achieve some kind of reality. Abstract art can include painting or sculpture, and is often distorted or exaggerated.

Many people enjoy abstract art because it gives them freedom to interpret the work as they please. It is also a great way for artists to express themselves.

(Photo Credit: Museum of Fine Arts)

(Photo Credit: Museum of Fine Arts)


Landscape, Abstracted
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
465 Huntington Ave., Gallery 265
Boston, MA 02115
(617) 267-9300
www.mfa.org

Running through June 30, 2017, “Landscape, Abstracted,” is comprised of 10 works ranging from sculptures to video art. According to the website, artist Jason Middlebrook painted the largest wall of the exhibit where he “created tension between something organic and something man-made.” Another artist featured in the exhibit, Anne Lindberg, uses only thread and staples in her creations.

The exhibit is open during normal museum hours, and regular museum admission is required to enter.

(Photo Credit: Alternative Art Space Gallery)

(Photo Credit: Alternative Art Space Gallery)


Alternative Art Space
450 Harrison Ave., Suite 309C
Boston, MA 02118
(774) 242-9567
www.alternativeartspace.net

Artwork created by Fernando DeOliveira is on display at the Alternative Art Space. His pieces are described as “engaging and colorful.” The exhibit will run on Tuesdays-Fridays, 10:00 a.m. through 5:00 p.m. and by appointment for the remainder of the summer.

(Photo Credit: Lanoue Gallery)

(Photo Credit: Lanoue Gallery)


Lanoue Gallery
450 Harrison Ave., Suite 31
Boston, MA 02118
(617) 262-4400
www.lanouegallery.com

Catch the final days of the show featuring works created by Christine Vaillancourt and KX2 (Ruth Avra and Dana Kleinman), on display from July 17 – Aug. 22. The exhibit features geometric abstractions that connect 1950s patterning and modern technology. The exhibit is open to the public Tuesday-Saturday, 10:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m., and on Sundays from 11:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Lanoue is a full service gallery that offers consultations to anyone seeking an expert opinion. Their professional staff is able to help art enthusiasts pick out the best pieces for their home or office.

Related:  Boston’s Best Summer Art Festivals

(Photo Credit: Newton Free Library)

(Photo Credit: Newton Free Library)


Newton Free Library
330 Homer St.
Newton, MA 02459
(617) 796-1360
www.newtonfreelibrary.net

Abstract Imagery by Chuck Guest will be on display at the Newton Free Library through Aug. 30. Library visitors who wish to view Guests’ acrylics on canvas will be able to do so during normal library hours, but the gallery will be closed on Sundays. Admission to the library is free, and all are welcome to check out the exhibit.

(Photo Credit: Museum Of Fine Arts)

(Photo Credit: Museum Of Fine Arts)


Nature, Sculpture, Abstraction, And Clay
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
465 Huntington Ave., Gallery 231
Boston, MA 02115
(617) 267-9300
www.mfa.org

Museum visitors can enjoy a unique look at ceramic art ranging from the late 19th century to present day. There are three sections to this exhibit (sculpture and abstraction, nature and landscape, and surface and decoration), and a total of 70 pieces to view. This is the first time that many of these pieces have been on display at a museum, which is very exciting for both the respective artist and the art-lover. The website explains that these pieces explore both functional and sculptural aspects, and “push boundaries” in those areas.

Regular museum admission is required to enter this gallery, which will be on display until mid-January 2016.

Related: Art Lover’s Walking Tour Of Boston

Boston-based writer Effie Orfanides keeps up with all of the latest happenings in her city. She loves eating at Boston’s hotspots, having drinks at the trendiest bars, and enjoying all that Boston has to offer. Her work can be found at Examiner.com.

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