SALEM (CBS/AP) — Will Congress get involved in the Britney Spears conservatorship battle? Massachusetts Rep. Seth Moulton posed the question to social media Friday.

“This Britney Spears conservatorship—a word I didn’t know until yesterday—is some of the craziest s— I’ve seen in a long time,” the Salem Democrat tweeted. “Do you think Congress should investigate?”

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After 13 years of near silence in the conservatorship that controls her life and money, Britney Spears passionately told a judge Wednesday that she wants to end the “abusive” case that has made her feel demoralized and enslaved.

Speaking in open court for the first time in the case, Spears condemned her father and others who control the conservatorship, which she said has compelled her to use birth control and take other medications against her will, and prevented her from getting married or having another child.

“This conservatorship is doing me way more harm than good,” the 39-year-old Spears said. “I deserve to have a life.”

She spoke fast and sprinkled profanity into the written speech that lasted more than 20 minutes as her parents, fans and journalists listed to an audio livestream. Many of the details Spears revealed have been carefully guarded by the court for years.

Spears told Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Brenda Penny that “I want to end this conservatorship without being evaluated.”

Penny thanked the pop star for her “courageous” words but made no rulings. A long legal process is likely before any decision is made on terminating the conservatorship.

Moulton isn’t the only member of Congress who has showed support for Spears. Texas Sen. Ted Cruz also tweeted #FreeBritney.

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When a person is considered to have a severely diminished mental capacity, a court can step in and grant someone the power to make financial decisions and major life choices for them.

California law says a conservatorship, called a guardianship in some states, is justified for a “person who is unable to provide properly for his or her personal needs for physical health, food, clothing, or shelter,” or for someone who is “substantially unable to manage his or her own financial resources or resist fraud or undue influence.”

The conservator, as the appointee put in charge is called, may be a family member, a close friend or a court-appointed professional.

Fans who dote on Britney Spears’ social media posts and public statements, trying to decipher her every utterance, dance move or shared meme, have increasingly coalesced into a movement after becoming convinced she was being controlled unfairly. Key were two women who in 2017 turned their hobby of picking apart Spears’ Instagram posts into a podcast, “ Britney’s ‘Gram.” It would help birth the hashtag #FreeBritney.

Hearings can bring dozens of protesters to the courthouse, carrying signs like “CONSERVATORSHIP IS SLAVERY” and “THIS IS TOXIC.”

Father James Spears has called the group conspiracy theorists, and says those who shout #FreeBritney don’t understand the totality of the situation.

Fans said after the most recent hearing that they felt vindicated by Britney Spears confirming much of what they have said.

(© Copyright 2021 CBS Broadcasting Inc. All Rights Reserved. The Associated Press contributed to this report.)

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