BOSTON (CBS) — Sunday’s Pet Parade, with Missing Dogs Massachusetts, is a little bit different.

Dingo and Dolly are not up for adoption–they actually ran away and became lost, a very big problem among rescue animals.

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Dingo. (WBZ-TV)

Dingo. (WBZ-TV)

When dogs are adopted from far-away places and brought to a new home, they don’t know their surroundings and haven’t yet bonded with their new families.

Often times, they sneak out and become lost, and their owners are petrified.

“The dogs are scared too,” says Belmont Animal Control Officer John Maguranis.

Dolly. (WBZ-TV)

Dolly. (WBZ-TV)

So what should you do if this happens to you?

“You should first call animal control, and then you should contact Missing Dogs of Massachusetts,” said Maguranis. “We will assist you in putting together a flyer, and then we will hang flyers…once we get the flyers up, we wait for calls to come in.”

Dolly’s owner, Sue, said Dolly jumped out of her pen and bolted out the door after she was taken home. Dolly was missing for six days.

The poster the group made for Dolly. (WBZ-TV)

The poster the group made for Dolly. (WBZ-TV)

“It was the most stressful week of my life,” Sue said. “We’re so glad we got her back.”

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Missing Dogs set up a feeding station that would ping Maguranis’s phone, and Dolly was caught!

Dolly, found! (WBZ-TV)

Dolly, found! (WBZ-TV)

“Typically dogs that are freightened and run away tend to pick areas where they feel safe,” said Maguranis.

Dingo was lost on the South Shore. He was a bit of a different case–he is a senior dog, and deaf, and was lost in the woods for five weeks with no food in the Hanover area.

The poster the group made for Dingo. (WBZ-TV)

The poster the group made for Dingo. (WBZ-TV)

When she was finally found, she was emaciated–but Carrie was overjoyed to see her again!

“It was really scary,” said her owner, Carrie. “I’ve owned her for nine years, so she’s a big part of my life. She’s never done something like this before, and I really don’t think I would have been able to find her without the help from Missing Dogs Massachusetts.”

Dingo and Carrie, reunited. (WBZ-TV)

Dingo and Carrie, reunited. (WBZ-TV)

If you would like to be a volunteer for Missing Dogs of Massachusetts, they will provide the training needed.

“I think Animal Control officers in the whole state should really be familiar with Missing Dogs Massachusetts,” said Maguranis, “because these types of dogs really need our help, our specialty.”

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You can get involved on their Facebook page, or by visiting MissingDogsMass.com.