By Cheryl Fiandaca

DEDHAM (CBS) – The Massachusetts Registry of Motor Vehicles took William Foley Jr.’s driver’s license away for life because he was a five-time drunk driver who killed a woman in 2001.

WBZ-TV’s I-Team found that hasn’t stopped Foley from driving. We confronted him outside his house in Dedham recently.

The I-Team saw Foley driving on three different days. The 59-year-old lost his license after a crash in June 2001 that left Christine Griffiths, a young mom, dead. Police said his blood-alcohol level was nearly three times the legal limit. He later pleaded guilty and was sentenced to four years in prison.

In a 2009 hearing Foley pleaded with the Registry to give him his license back. Griffiths’ family was there too.

Foley apologized for the crash and at the time said, “I was completely responsible and take all blame for the accident that occurred that tragic night. I am so, so sorry from the bottom of my heart.”

William Foley Jr. (WBZ-TV)

But Christine’s mom, an angry Barbara Roche shot back, saying “How dare you! Your remorse that you talk about is garbage.”

Foley didn’t end up getting the right to drive and he made another attempt in 2019, but withdrew from the scheduled hearing after the I-Team spoke to Christine’s family about his plans the night before.

“He killed my daughter, you’ve had prior convictions,” Roche told WBZ.

“It’s heartbreaking for the family and we feel for them. We see this all the time unfortunately,” Marykate DePamphilis of the Boston chapter of Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) told the I-Team.

Despite not having a valid license, Foley is driving. On this day, the I-Team saw him leaving his home driving a Mercedes with his wife in the car.

William Foley Jr. driving an SUV with his wife (WBZ-TV)

“A suspended license is like an honor system if you think about it, so people can still go out there and drive,” DePamphilis said.

We contacted Christine’s family to tell them we found Foley driving, but they were too upset to talk on camera.

Foley told the I-Team he has a restricted license, but the Registry says that’s not true. The agency sent the I-Team a copy of his driving record which shows the lifetime suspension still in effect.

“I received a letter from the RMV and I’m back on the road,” he said.

When the I-Team asked him to show us the letter or his driver’s license, he replied, “I’ll speak to my lawyer and be happy to provide that.”

Foley did not provide any documentation or records to the I-Team proving that he has a valid driver’s license. And we did not hear from his attorney. We also checked back again with the Registry and were told Foley was never granted any type of driver’s license and his right to operate is revoked.

Cheryl Fiandaca