By Mike LaCrosse

BOSTON (CBS) — Going virtual is now a reality for many small businesses like Third Piece.

“The business has changed — complete 180,” said Third Piece owner Kristen Lambert.

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Owner Kristen Lambert closed her South End boutique in January. They now teach all their knitting classes virtually and sell their products online. WBZ-TV first meet Lambert a year ago at her store just as the shutdown began. Now, she’s optimistic and looking ahead to a post-pandemic world.

Third Piece owner Kristen Lambert closed her South End boutique in January. They now teach all their knitting classes virtually and sell their products online. (WBZ-TV)

“It definitely makes me so proud to know that we made it through the last year it was just so tough for so many people,” said Lambert.

WBZ-TV also meet Ed Harrison from the Waltham-based PR firm InkHouse a year ago as he started working from home.

“First off, it’s been amazing that it’s been a year,” said Harrison.

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Harrison says his teams work hard to keep the office culture alive. They even make special, safe, socially distant home visits when promoting their employees.

“We’ve been able to sort of recreate those moments of joy in person. Quite frankly, I would love to keep doing that cause it’s been a lot of fun,” Harrison said.

People are also going virtual to create their own moments of joy and peace.

For Portsmouth, New Hampshire, yoga instructor Dannika Ross, it’s been a year of connecting with clients at home from her living room.

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“So treat it almost as if it’s normal. Yes, you might be talking to five black screens, but you know your words are still resonating, are still caring,” said Ross.

Mike LaCrosse