By Sarah Wroblewski

LINCOLN (CBS) — Six weeks of winter or an early spring? Groundhog day is this Sunday, Feb. 2– a day when everyone forgets to check in with their local meteorologist and trust a groundhog’s long term winter prediction.

Punxsutawney Phil in Pennsylvania gets most of the limelight, but did you know Massachusetts has an official state groundhog? Ms. G, who resides at the Mass Audubon Drumlin Farm Wildlife Sanctuary in Lincoln, has been appointed the forecasting duty since 2008. Her predictions have been correct more than 60% of the time.

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Ms. G has seen her shadow the last four years, but way this winter is going, many people wouldn’t be surprised if she didn’t see her shadow, signaling an early spring. However, the last time that happened was in 2015 when Boston had the snowiest winter ever recorded.

Ms. G (WBZ-TV)

But no matter the prediction, Sunday will be a fun day at Drumlin Farm.

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“After the forecast, we have all kinds of family-friendly activities,” said Renata Pomponi, Mass Audubon Drumlin Farm Wildlife Sanctuary Director. “There will be live music, hot cocoa, there are crafts and games and chances for people to learn about how to take action around climate change in Massachusetts.”

The farm will be celebrating not only Groundhog Day, but Climate Action Day, which gives people the chance to learn about nature in Massachusetts and how they can protect it.

“Wildlife like Ms. G really depend on a healthy climate in order to survive, and as our weather changes and our climate changes in Massachusetts, the impact on the animal is real,” Pomponi said. “So by making people aware of the things they can do to help fight climate change we are protecting our environment for animals like Ms. G.”

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The family event kicks off at 10 a.m. on Sunday.

Sarah Wroblewski