‘More Than Prostitution’: Human Trafficking Is Dark, Violent Issue Advocates Say

BOSTON (CBS) – A spotlight has been put on human trafficking after police in Jupiter, Florida announced that New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft will be charged in a prostitution bust.

“It’s more than prostitution because girls are tricked, they’re kidnapped,” said Barbara Anderson, president of All Hands In. “None of these women or girls want to be a prostitute, that isn’t what they thought about when they grew up.”

Anderson says the women sucked into the world of human trafficking are targeted, captured, and kept.

Barbara Anderson of All Hands In (WBZ-TV)

“It’s not like someone can just walk away from the situation when they’ve been trafficked. It’s really a dark, violent issue that somehow stays under the rug and doesn’t come out,” she added.

Kraft denies doing anything illegal. He faces two misdemeanor charges of soliciting another for prostitution. Police said they are in the process of issuing a warrant in the case.

“None of this would happen if those men were not availing themselves and participating in this human misery,” Sheriff William Snyder, Marion County Florida, explained.

Police said Kraft was involved in two incidents in the last month at the Orchids of Asia Day Spa in Jupiter. Kraft is one of 25 people who will be charged by Jupiter Police in this specific bust.

“Middle class and upper class men who are married, have children, have good jobs are really the clients and that’s the hardest to understand,” Anderson said.

The international sting ranges from Florida to New York to China and already about 200 people have been implicated. Police say women were living inside the 10 spas they raided and had an average of eight clients every day.

Police outside Orchids of Asia Day Spa in Jupiter, Florida (WBZ-TV)

Investigators watched as the alleged pimps, sometimes also called groomers, moved millions of dollars.

“I mean, we followed as much as 20 million dollars moving in and out of China,” Sheriff Snyder added.

A dark, lucrative business, disturbingly different than drug trafficking.

“Because you can sell a woman over and over again,” Anderson said.

Real women, who Anderson says are often moved from place to place, kept in deplorable conditions and are completely isolated.

“They are somebody’s daughter. They are somebody’s sister, somebody’s friend. A mother. And it’s not just foreign girls being brought in. Our own girl’s right here in the state are very much at risk and human trafficking happens in every community in this country and once it leaves one community, it pops up in another,” Anderson explained.

Investigators believe they found at least six victims of human trafficking.

“We’re working with advocacy groups and interpreters and getting as much support for them as we possibly can,” Juniper Police Chief Daniel Kerr explained.

Anderson hopes by releasing the details of this case as well as the names of each man involved, people will finally open their eyes to a very real issue and help the victims recover.

“They have just been trampled down yet they come up again fighting, fighting for a new life but it’s hard because they have been very scarred they don’t have money they don’t have family for the most part to support them to help them,” Anderson said. “They’ve got to try to figure all of this out and how to put themselves back together again that takes a lot of courage.”

“We tend to just put band aids on issues that’s all we will do is put band aids and the sore will never heal,” Anderson added.

For more information about assisting survivors of human trafficking visit: http://www.allhandsinma.org/

We and our partners use cookies to understand how you use our site, improve your experience and serve you personalized content and advertising. Read about how we use cookies in our cookie policy and how you can control them by clicking Manage Settings. By continuing to use this site, you accept these cookies.