Throughout the Summer and Fall hardly a day goes by without at least one farmers’ market open somewhere in greater Boston. From Copley to Cambridge, on down to Dorchester and beyond, local communities have formed groups to support farmers, butchers, fishmongers, bakers and more, from all over Eastern Massachusetts by giving them a seasonal place to sell their wares in the city. Here are just five of the best of Boston’s many farmers’ markets.

Copley Square Farmers’ Market
139 James St.
Boston, MA 02116
(781) 893-8222
www.massfarmersmarkets.org/copley
Dates: Tuesdays and Fridays, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Twice a week more than two dozen area farmers brave the morning traffic to set up stalls at the corner of Dartmouth and Boylston Streets near Copley Square. The meat and produce are fresh and of high quality. Prices are perhaps a tad higher than similar markets in the suburbs and small towns – but this market is, after all, in the beating heart of Boston and its financial district. The organizers bill it as “the biggest and busiest farmers’ market” in Boston, and while not always the former, it is always definitely the later. A great experience for those who work downtown to pick up the freshest of the fresh to supplement their lunch or to bring home for dinner.

South Boston Farmers’ Market
446 W. Broadway
Boston, MA 02127
(617) 268-9610
www.facebook.com/South-Boston-Farmers-Market-293116144114043
Dates: Mondays, 12 p.m. to 6 p.m.
The South Boston Neighborhood Development Corporation hosts and organizes a stellar once-weekly farmers’ market in, well, South Boston, of course. Supported by grants from a local foundation, the organizers have been able to draw upon a regular and reliable group of local farmers and vendors, who offer not only fruit and vegetables but also pies and other pastries, as well as meat and fish. Those who stroll from vendor to vendor will usually also find fresh eggs, local honey and jams and other delights, and at affordable (by farmers’ market standards) prices.

East Boston Farmers’ Market
Central Park Square
Boston, MA
(617) 568-4783
www.ebnhc.org/en/food-access/farmers-market.html
Dates: Wednesdays from 3 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.
Every Wednesday afternoon from July 11 through October 17, farmers and other fresh food vendors gather at Central Park Square (across from the Liberty Shopping Center at 200 Border Street) to offer their wares. This is more than just a place to buy green beans and apples, however, as it is also something of a small fair, complete with local musicians. The market accepts WIC (Women, Infants, and Children) vouchers and Senior farmers’ Market coupons, and is committed to helping feed, bring together and develop the community. It only accepts vendors from within a 100-mile radius of Boston – but does so with an eye to creating and rewarding diversity.
Related: Mobile Farmers Market

Central Square Farmers’ Market
76 Bishop Allen Drive
Cambridge, MA 02139
(781) 893-8222
www.massfarmersmarkets.org/central
Dates: Mondays from 12 p.m. to 6 p.m.
Cambridge definitely has the right crowd for vendors of local farm-fresh produce, and every Monday from mid-May through mid-November they flock in droves to the stalls at the Central Square Farmers’ Market on Bishop Allen Drive. This market attracts both the usual collection of local producers as well as a number of local restaurants who offer prepared foods on a scheduled rotation. What other farmers’ market boasts a vendor selling authentic Egyptian cuisine, or features “Samosa Man?” Their vendors not only take major credit/debit cards but also EBT and similar coupons.

Ashmount Farmers’ Market
900 Dorchester Ave.
Boston, MA 02124
(617) 825-3846
www.greaterashmont.org/farmers-market
Dates: Fridays from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m.
Although it usually only has four principal vendors at a time, the Ashmount Farmers’ Market has been attracting more and more customers since it first opened in 2009. There are always two local farmers, a baker, and a fishmonger present at its site on MBTA plaza, but there are also seven smaller stalls that feature a unique and rotating array of specialty vendors. Musicians and community organizers stroll about, entertaining and educating many of the close to 500 people who come to the market every Friday.
Related: Phantom Gourmet Finds Tasty Treats At Farmer’ Markets Little Bakeshop

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