Boston’s Best Speakeasy Bars

April 23, 2015 6:00 AM

(Photo Credit Charley Gallay/Getty Images for Malibu Red)

The term speakeasy was used to define underground bars which sold alcohol during the time of American Prohibition where the sale of spirits was deemed illegal for public consumption. Now the term falls more within the lines of old school, retro-minded style bars. With many of Boston’s young and hip pubs choosing to mold themselves in this classic mode of cool, here are five of Boston’s best speakeasy bars.

(Photo Credit: Wink & Nod)

(Photo Credit: Wink & Nod)



Wink & Nod
3 Appleton St
Boston, MA 02116
(617) 482-0117
www.winkandnod.com

Located between Tremont St. and Berkeley St. in the city’s South End district, Wink & Nod is all  about the decor and atmosphere which brings upscale speakeasies of old along with a hip and modern flair. This Appleton St. joint celebrates a unique and imaginative selection of spirits and mixed drinks alongside their equally inventive dinner menu. This creates a vibe which is perfect for both impressing that big date or heading out for a fancy evening with friends.

Related: Boston’s Best Steakhouses

(Photo Credit: jm Curley)

(Photo Credit: jm Curley)


Jm Curley
21 Temple Pl
Boston, MA 02111
(617) 338-5333
www.jmcurleyboston.com

Jm Curley is another popular Boston bar with a definite speakeasy vibe, one that keeps loyal clientele coming back night after night with remarkable consistency. Jm Curley is located between Tremont St. and Winter Place in Downtown Boston. It balances its retro and classically minded decor with a dining sensibility which is anything but traditional. The food here at Jm Curley is as exciting as the drink menu, taking those old school ideas of fried treats and comfort food and elevating them with a twist. Jm Curley is definitely a speakeasy bar for the foodie minded.

(Image Credit: Carrie Nation)

(Image Credit: Carrie Nation)


Carrie Nation Restaurant & Cocktail Club
11 Beacon St
Boston, MA 02108
(617) 227-3100
www.carrienationcocktailclub.com

“The Carrie Nations” were the name of the lead rock group from the classic Russ Meyer and Roger Ebert 1970 B-movie Beyond the Valley of the Dolls. This film is indicative of the wild and swinging sentiment of sixties, transitioning into the decadent 1970s. The Carrie Nation Restaurant and Cocktail Club takes their old school inspiration a bit further, combining that love of 60s and 70s sentiment with an even more vintage speakeasy approach of the 1920s to the cocktail and supper club. They bring that idea straight into the modern day with ultra cool decor with delicious food and an amazing drink selection.

Related: Boston’s Best Irish Bars

(Photo Credit: Lucky's Lounge)

(Photo Credit: Lucky’s Lounge)


Lucky’s Lounge
355 Congress St
Boston, MA 02210
(617) 357-5825
www.luckyslounge.com

Lucky’s Lounge is South Boston’s own classic speakeasy bar, an old school joint centered over on Congress St., between A St. and Pittsburgh St. just off the Waterfront and Court House Station. Lucky’s Lounge has “Sunday Sinatra” which brings impersonations of Frank Sinatra’s legendary voice and music. Meanwhile, the kitchen cranks out classic, old school dishes like roasted chicken along with this super cool speakeasy atmosphere.

(Photo Credit: Drink)

(Photo Credit: Drink)


Drink
348 Congress St
Boston, MA 02228
(617) 695-1806
www.drinkfortpoint.com

Drink is another fantastic speakeasy style spot located on Congress St. off the city’s Waterfront district in South Boston. The waitstaff is always dressed for the occasion and they treat the customer with friendly service one might expect from a classic underground speakeasy during the days of Prohibition. Drink has elegant mixed spirits along with inventive dishes from the kitchen. Making a visit here is a great idea for any occasion.

George Pacheco has been writing professionally about arts and entertainment for over a decade. A graduate of the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, George currently resides in a humble New England home with his wife, cat and massive music and film collection. His work can be found at Examiner.com.

Watch & Listen LIVE