Boston’s Best Indoor Art For Kids

October 20, 2010 6:59 PM

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(credit: The Imperial Household Agency via Getty Images)

(credit: The Imperial Household Agency via Getty Images)

Given that we live in a city that offers four distinct seasons, for a considerable chunk of the year, it’s imperative to know of good options for indoor entertainment. It’s not surprising that in a cultural city such as Boston there’s no shortage of indoor places to get creative. Here are some great spots to unleash your child’s creative beast.
The Boston Childrens Museum

(credit: bostonkids.org)

Local Museums

While not offering drop in studio time, the Museum of Fine Arts and Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston and the Fuller Craft Museum in Brockton warrant mention for their periodic art programming for kids (and the MFA offers regular art classes for children). The Boston Children’s Museum offers daily art studio hours, as well as daily PlaySpace hours slotted for messy sensory activities.

Artbeat in Arlington

(credit: artbeatonline.com)

Artbeat

Artbeat in Arlington is a craft store that also hosts a studio workspace. Staffers offer options based on your child’s age and interests and then set your child up with the project of their choice.

Clay-Dreams-in-Arlington

(credit: claydreams.com)

Pottery Painting

On the Mass. Ave. corridor, Made by Me in Cambridge and Clay Dreams in Arlington offer fun locations for kids to paint their own pottery. If your daughter is as voracious a painter as mine, an outing can get a little spendy, but the adorable and creative additions to our plate and mug collection are well worth the money.

Muckykids-Art-Studio

(credit: muckykids.com)

Muckykids

Also on the Mass. Ave. corridor in Cambridge is the newer Muckykids Art Studio, which is run by a local mother and teacher. Offering classes, open studio time, and party hosting, this cozy creative space is replete with options to stimulate young artists.

Whimsy

(credit: whimsyartsandcrafts.com)

Whimsy

I have yet to visit Whimsy (it’s a bit further afield in Framingham), but with over 4,000 square feet of space that includes creative options such as mining sluice, Peruvian drum painting, and mosaics, I imagine the creative possibilities are endless.

Christine Koh is a music and brain scientist turned freelance writer, editor, and designer. She is the founder and editor of Boston Mamas, the designer behind Posh Peacock, writes a personal blog at Pop Discourse, and pens the column Minimalist Mama. She resides in the Boston area with her husband and 6-year-old daughter and is expecting her second child in March 2011. She tweets about it all at @bostonmamas.
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