Hub Of Invention

May 15 is National Chocolate Chip Day.  Did you know Massachusetts resident Ruth Wakefield, owner of the Toll House Inn in Wakefield, accidentally invented the chocolate chip cookie in the 1930s when the chocolate she used to make her specialty cookies did not fully melt. The chocolate in that batch was from a bar of Nestle bitter chocolate. She reached out to Nestle and they began producing chocolate chips. Thanks, Ruth!!!

Besides the chocolate chip cookie, Massachusetts boasts many more inventions. Click through the gallery to see some of them. (Photo by Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images)
May 15 is National Chocolate Chip Day May 15 is National Chocolate Chip Day. Did you know Massachusetts resident Ruth Wakefield, owner of the Toll House Inn in Wakefield, accidentally invented the chocolate chip cookie in the 1930s when the chocolate she used to make her specialty cookies did not fully melt. The chocolate in that batch was from a bar of Nestle bitter chocolate. She reached out to Nestle and they began producing chocolate chips. Thanks, Ruth!!! Besides the chocolate chip cookie, Massachusetts boasts many more inventions. Click through the gallery to see some of them. (Photo by Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images)
(Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
Vulcanised Rubber - Woburn, 1839 by Charles Goodyear (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
Soon after launching the site, the inventors of Facebook quit college to develop the popular social network into a business (Photo by Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images)
Facebook - Cambridge, 2004 by Mark Zuckerberg Soon after launching the site, the inventors of Facebook quit college to develop the popular social network into a business (Photo by Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images)
Goddard also invented a smaller handheld rocket launcher that became the forerunner to the modern bazooka. (Photo by Matt Stroshane/Getty Images)
Liquid Fueled Rocket - Auburn, 1926 by Robert Goddard Goddard also invented a smaller handheld rocket launcher that became the forerunner to the modern bazooka. (Photo by Matt Stroshane/Getty Images)
Harvey Ball never patented his iconic logo and never profited from it. At its peak of popularity, more than 50 million Smiley Face buttons were sold. (Photo by Chris McGrath/Getty Images)
Smiley Face Logo - Worcester, 1964 by Harvey Ball Harvey Ball never patented his iconic logo and never profited from it. At its peak of popularity, more than 50 million Smiley Face buttons were sold. (Photo by Chris McGrath/Getty Images)
The first microwave was called a 'Radarange' and was closer in size to a modern refridgerator, standing nearly six feet tall. (Photo by Tim Boyle/Getty Images)
Microwave Oven - Cambridge, 1946 by Percy Spencer The first microwave was called a 'Radarange' and was closer in size to a modern refridgerator, standing nearly six feet tall. (Photo by Tim Boyle/Getty Images)
Query sold the formula for Fluff to H. Allen Durkee and Fred L. Mower who developed it into the product we know today. (Photo by Jot Powers/Wikimedia Commons)
Marshmallow Fluff - Somerville, 1917 by Archibald Query Query sold the formula for Fluff to H. Allen Durkee and Fred L. Mower who developed it into the product we know today. (Photo by Jot Powers/Wikimedia Commons)
Bell did not set out to invent the telephone. He was trying to develop a new type of electric telegraph. (Photo by Junji Kurokawa/AFP/Getty Images)
Telephone - Boston, 1876 by Alexander Graham Bell Bell did not set out to invent the telephone. He was trying to develop a new type of electric telegraph. (Photo by Junji Kurokawa/AFP/Getty Images)
Land first got the idea for instant photography after his daughter complained about having to wait so long for photos to be developed before seeing them. (Photo by David Becker/Getty Images)
Polaroid Camera/Instant Photography - Cambridge, 1947 by Dr. Edwin Land Land first got the idea for instant photography after his daughter complained about having to wait so long for photos to be developed before seeing them. (Photo by David Becker/Getty Images)
The first game of basketball was played with a soccer ball and two peach baskets served as hoops. (Photo by Nathaniel S. Butler/NBAE via Getty Images)
Basketball - Springfield, 1891 by Dr. James Naismith The first game of basketball was played with a soccer ball and two peach baskets served as hoops. (Photo by Nathaniel S. Butler/NBAE via Getty Images)
Volleyball was first called 'Mintonette'. The named was changed after a spectator observed the sport involved a lot of 'volleying' (Photo by Darren McCollester/Getty Images)
Volleyball - Holyoke, 1895 by William G. Morgan Volleyball was first called 'Mintonette'. The named was changed after a spectator observed the sport involved a lot of 'volleying' (Photo by Darren McCollester/Getty Images)
This tall ship was named after an observer mentioned how it 'schooned' (skipped) over the water. Robinson reportedly replied, "a Schooner she shall be, then!" (Photo by Stephen Munday/Allsport)
Schooner - Gloucester, 1713 by Andrew Robinson This tall ship was named after an observer mentioned how it 'schooned' (skipped) over the water. Robinson reportedly replied, "a Schooner she shall be, then!" (Photo by Stephen Munday/Allsport)
Birdseye first got the idea for frozen foods when he noticed that fish, instantly frozen by the Eskimos, retained its flavor and freshness months afterwards. (Photo by William Thomas Cain/Getty Images)
Packaged Frozen Foods - Springfield, 1930 by Clarence Birdseye Birdseye first got the idea for frozen foods when he noticed that fish, instantly frozen by the Eskimos, retained its flavor and freshness months afterwards. (Photo by William Thomas Cain/Getty Images)
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