WATCH LIVE: WBZ-TV News
WEATHER ALERT: Tropical Storm Warning For Cape Cod & Islands | Forecast | BlogRadar | Weather App

First Responders Converge On Massachusetts To Learn How To Deal With Makeshift Drug Labs

DENNIS (CBS) – First responders got a look at what they will face when they’re taking action at an improvised drug lab.

Members of law enforcement and firefighters from all corners of the country converged Thursday on a clandestine drug lab assembled in a landfill. The makeshift lab was in a back corner of Dennis’ Public Works Facility.

State Police Bomb Squad spokesman Sergeant William Qualls says the training involves representatives of multiple agencies.

state police bomb squad spokesman william qualls First Responders Converge On Massachusetts To Learn How To Deal With Makeshift Drug Labs

State Police Bomb Squad spokesman Sergeant William Qualls. (Photo credit: WBZ-TV)

“We have first responders, arson investigators, some of the best in the country, and when they respond to a scene, they need to be made aware of what they’re looking for and what may  have potentially caused that fire at that residence or business,” Qualls said.

dummy on fire First Responders Converge On Massachusetts To Learn How To Deal With Makeshift Drug Labs

A test dummy set on fire by exploding chemicals. (Photo credit: WBZ-TV)

Organized by NES Global, a former DEA Agent, and current police officers, the training highlighted the hazards faced by law enforcement and fire fighters in dealing with “pop-up” drug labs, fentanyl, and opiods.

The training took first responders step-by-step through what goes on inside those labs.

Instructors actually mixed chemicals to make methamphetamines.

“What we’re trying to do is to make it safe and give everybody an idea of what to look for and how to handle the situations that might arise,” Qualls said.

agents mixing chemicals First Responders Converge On Massachusetts To Learn How To Deal With Makeshift Drug Labs

Police and fire fighters mix chemicals to learn how to deal with methamphetamines and fentanyl. (Photo credit: WBZ-TV)

The training was timely because carfentanil, a more powerful form of fentanyl, was recently discovered in Massachusetts. That’s an opioid that is used to sedate elephants and an amount as small as a penny could be fatal.

The carfentanil discovery was made when police tests from three drug samples, two from Brockton and one from Quincy on Wednesday, tested positive for the substance.

Comments

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

More From CBS Boston

Opioid Crisis
Download Our App
Download Weather App

Watch & Listen LIVE