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Two Confirmed Cases Of Measles In MetroWest

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FRAMINGHAM (CBS) — Health officials are reporting two confirmed cases of measles in MetroWest.

The Massachusetts Department of Health says one of the patients was in the Framingham Trader Joe’s On February 15th and 16th. Officials won’t say whether the patient is a worker or a customer.

The measles look and feel like a cold at first.

Patients may develop a cough, fever, runny rose and red watery eyes.

These first symptoms start about ten days after infection.

A few days later, a red blotchy rash starts on the face then spreads to the rest of the body.

According to the DPH, measles is a very contagious disease that usually lasts a week or two. It can cause serious problems like ear infections, pneumonia, swelling of the brain in some people, especially pregnant women, infants, and those with weakened immune systems. Adults are also at increased risk for severe disease and may need to be hospitalized due to complications.

The DPH has the following tips for people who believe they may have been exposed to measles.

What should you do?

• If you were born in the U.S. before 1957, it is very likely that you are immune to measles. However, to increase the likelihood you are protected against measles, mumps and rubella, consider receiving a dose of MMR vaccine.

• If you were born in the US on or after 1957, and you do not have documentation of having 2 doses of MMR or measles-containing vaccine or serologic evidence of immunity, you must receive a dose of vaccine as soon as possible.

• If you were born outside of the US (regardless of year of birth), and you do not have documentation of having 2 doses of MMR or measles-containing vaccine, or serologic evidence of immunity, you should call your provider to receive a dose of vaccine as soon as possible.

A blood test showing you are protected against measles is also acceptable evidence of immunity. However, a past history of measles disease is not adequate proof of immunity.

If you develop symptoms of measles, please stay home and call your doctor.

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