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ACLU: Aaron Hernandez Isolation Raises Issues With Solitary Confinement (page 2)

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Aaron Hernandez arrested at his home in North Attleboro, June 26, 2013. (Photo courtesy: Boston Globe-George Rizer)

Aaron Hernandez arrested at his home in North Attleboro, June 26, 2013. (Photo courtesy: Boston Globe-George Rizer)

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“He’s high-profile,” Sheriff Tom Hodgson told WBZ-TV last week. “Anybody with a high profile, we’re very careful with. There are people in the prison who would like to make a name for themselves.”

“He’s being treated as any other prisoner, no better, no worse,” Hodgson said. “All of the people that are in the unit that he’s in are all in single cells, no inmates are allowed out with any other inmate.”

Hernandez is allowed five visitors a week, but only after they’re screened by the Sheriff. That does not include his attorneys.

Here is the ACLU’s response, from the blog:

“It is time to recognize that “protective custody” is a misnomer for a destructive practice. It does little to protect prisoners from the devastating psychological effects of isolation. It drastically diminishes chances for rehabilitation. And according to some studies, prisoners released directly from supermax confinement have significantly higher recidivism rates.

If nothing else, maybe all the press attention Hernandez’s case is getting will help debunk the myth of “protective” solitary confinement.”

What do you think?

Is solitary confinement necessary or unfair? Share your opinions in the comments section below.

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