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Local Company In ‘Blue Ivy’ Trademark Dispute With Beyonce, Jay-Z

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(Photo credit should read EMMANUEL DUNAND/AFP/Getty Images)

(Photo credit should read EMMANUEL DUNAND/AFP/Getty Images)

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BOSTON (CBS) – A local wedding planning company is going up against two of the biggest names in music.

They both want to trademark the name “Blue Ivy.”

Veronica Alexandra has been running her Boston-based event firm Blue Ivy for the past three years. She hadn’t thought of filing for trademark protection of the name because it is so unique.

WBZ-TV’s Karen Anderson reports

But, on Jan. 9, two days after Beyonce’s daughter Blue Ivy was born, the singer and her husband Jay-Z filed for trademark protection of the name.

Of course, now Alexandra has filed for trademark protection as well.

“If Beyonce is going to take certain topics and certain categories and put her thumb print on them, then we need to say what we’re going to put our thumb print on and protect that now,” Alexandra told WBZ-TV. “At the end of the day, I did come up with the name before… I love her to death, sparkles and glitter, kudos and high fives, but don’t impede on my business, and my career. I think that is the point. I don’t have time for that garbage.”

Alexandra says she named her company to reflect wedding tradition and romanticism.

The trademark office will consider a variety of things in this case, including the similarity of the marks: one is Blue Ivy (the wedding planning company), one is Blue Ivy Carter (the baby’s name).

They will also look at which person used the name first, according to a local trademark lawyer.

“I have definitely confirmed the fact that when there is usage in commerce, you do definitely have some rights in that category. So, we should pretty much be in the clear,” Alexandra told WBZ NewsRadio 1030.

WBZ NewsRadio 1030’s Laurie Kirby reports

Lisa van der Pool of the Boston Business Journal reports.

Boston Patent and Trademark Attorney Bob Tendler says Alexandra has a case.

“Good for her,” he said. “The bottom line is she used it first, and in trademark matters, he who uses it first wins. The question is what did she use it first for?”

If there was to be a trademark battle, Tendler says Veronica could have an edge, if she trademarks and sells the product first.

“It’s important for people who have businesses who have trademarks to file federally for a trademark. If you don’t file, you don’t have an opportunity to win or lose. It’s like if you don’t take the picture, it will never come out,” he said.

Veronica won’t say what she hopes to sell, but Veronica has applied for trademark protection for items ranging from wedding portraits to party favors.

WBZ-TV’s Karen Anderson and BBJ’s Lisa Van Der Pool contributed to this report.

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