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Twitter Leads Commuter Train Crew To Rider’s Lost Engagement Ring

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Conover Tuttle Pace posted this picture of the ring on their Facebook page.

Conover Tuttle Pace posted this picture of the ring on their Facebook page.

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BOSTON (CBS)  – A woman lost her engagement ring on her ride to work Tuesday, but she got it back thanks to Twitter and some sharp-eyed commuter rail workers.

Katelyn Peckham was traveling on the Haverhill Line when she misplaced the ring, which contains a diamond that once belonged to her mother.

She didn’t realize she had lost it until Peckham arrived at work.

“I panicked, I burst into tears, I told everyone in the office,” she said.

In a panic, her friends and family sent out emails and messages to help spread the word about their desperate search.

One of Katelyn’s co-workers posted a frantic alert on Twitter, which caught the eye of the MBCR, which runs the commuter line.

Within minutes, North Station Trainmaster Rick Currier announced the search for the ring over the intercom at the station and he radioed train crews.

Tom Booth, a conductor on the train found it.

“I was walking back to the head end of the train and I looked down and I saw a ring laying on the floor of the train. I picked it up and thought it was fake at first,” he said.

He described the event as “the most exciting thing I’ve had happen since I’ve been here.”

WBZ NewsRadio 1030’s Ben Parker reports

Because of the tweets, rail officials found Katelyn, and she was reunited with her ring.

WBZ-TV’s Bill Shields reports

The entire incident lasted about an hour, but it was the longest hour of Katelyn’s life.

“I am so grateful for people like you! Today was almost the worst day of my life. Not only was it my engagement ring but it was my mother’s first diamond on that ring and so it broke my heart in a million pieces to think that I had lost it forever. I can’t say thank you enough to the MBTA employees for treating the situation as if it were each their own. And for everyone who tweeted about it – that could have been the reason it was found,” she wrote in a thank you note.

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