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Boston Students Fighting To Make Condoms More Available

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(credit: AP)

(credit: AP)

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BOSTON (CBS) – Students, educators and health professionals met with city councilors on Tuesday night to discuss the condom policy in Boston schools.

In New York public high schools, condoms have been offered for free for many years. The same is not true in Boston.

Kimpsha Grant, 17, lobbied for the policy change before a packed room inside Boston City Hall.

WBZ-TV’s Kate Merrill reports.

“A lot of my friends got pregnant at an early age, and I saw them struggle to finish school and support their children at the same time,” said Grant, a student.

Grant is hoping to help get things changed for Boston students.

“I think that teens are responsible and they want to make the right decisions for themselves, but they need the tools to make them,” said Grant.

The kids hope to improve sex education in schools and access to free condoms.

The students even started the campaign with a video.

“It would be healthy because kids would learn how to do things in a safe manner,” said Samantha Brea, a student.

Now, access is limited. Under the current policy, parents must agree to allow their child to get a condom, and they can only get it at one of the nine health centers.

The kids are facing a fight, however.

“We are failing all our teenagers, who are given the impression that as long as they are using condoms, they are practicing safe and responsible behavior,” said Maggie McLean, who is against the proposal.

Some argue that condoms are not the answer.

“They can say it reduces the risk but they can never use the word ‘prevent,’” said Deb O’Hara Rusckowski, who is against the proposal.

The two Boston city councilors in attendance supported the students and commended them for going through the process.

Health officials said that 54 percent of students in Boston public schools are sexually active.

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